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Home / News / Kitsbrow releases new Power Wool compression fabric

Kitsbrow releases new Power Wool compression fabric

03
Dec '18
Courtesy: Kitsbrow
Courtesy: Kitsbrow
Kitsbow has planned to expand its line of premium bike apparel in partnership with Polartec by releasing new Power Wool Performance Knicker, Tight, Arm Warmer and Knee Warmer, all of which will be made locally in the US. The products will be made of a new compression version of Polartec Power Wool fabric technology, a superior bi-component knit.

The unique plated construction of Polartec Power Wool fabric will combine best of natural and synthetic fibres, without blending them. It will place only soft, high-quality merino wool next to skin where it creates a comfortable microclimate, moves moisture in a vapour state and is naturally antimicrobial, while synthetic fibres on the outside enhance stretch, recovery, durability, and more effectively manage moisture, the companies said in a joint press release.

“The industry standard of blending wool and synthetic yarns together can hinder the performance of the material, but Polartec’s Power Wool construction is incredibly advanced and has optimised our base layers for killer performance, no matter the condition,” said Zander Nosler, founder and CEO of Kitsbow. “This collection is also made ‘just in time’ in Petaluma, bringing our number of styles made in the US up to 50 per cent - and growing.”

“This new compression stretch version of Power Wool enables greater comfort and performance for cycling in cool to cold conditions,” said Gary Smith, Polartec CEO. “We knew Kitsbow would find it to be highly useful and make beautiful product from it, so we’re very pleased to partner with them for the launch.” (PC)

Fibre2Fashion News Desk – India

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